All Tomorrow’s Kitchens

Bee-Free Honey, a CRISPR Seed Bank, and Super Daddies

A weekly roundup of everything bringing humans closer to a food-secure future

Yasmin Tayag
Future Human
Published in
3 min readOct 31, 2020

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All Tomorrow’s Kitchens, a weekly series from Future Human, rounds up advances in food and agricultural science, tech, business, and culture bringing all humans closer to a food-secure future. Read last week’s story here.

Honey without the bees. A California startup called Melibio is attempting to overhaul honey production by producing it through an entirely biosynthetic process. Doing so, as the company’s founder explains in Food Dive, can ensure a more consistent honey supply. Synthetic honey wouldn’t be weather-dependent, and it’d be easier to avoid the adulterants that bees tend to pick up in the wild. It could also prove more humane than traditional honey production since it doesn’t require using smoke to calm bees or clipping the queen’s wings. Whether the natural-food-loving public will opt for synthetic honey is another question, but if the global bee population continues its precipitous decline, eventually, we may not have a choice.

Alaska’s salmon farmers fight to save Tongass forest. The biggest forest in the United States is Tongass National Forest, a pristine, 17-million-acre expanse sprawling across southeastern Alaska. This week, the U.S. Department of Agriculture passed legislation opening Tongass up for logging and road-building. Many are horrified — Tongass is the world’s largest temperate rainforest and home to ancient trees and endangered animals — but perhaps none so much as Alaska’s salmon fishers, who criticize the argument that opening up the forest will create more jobs for Alaskans. Salmon fishing in the Tongass brings in 50 million fish and $986 million annually, writes Sam Bloch in The Counter. Opening up the forest not only threatens the salmon but also the many residents (and other animals) whose lives depend on them.

A seed bank for CRISPR-edited seeds. Gene editing has huge potential to protect our food supply from the anticipated effects of climate change. Banking on that potential is a startup called Inari, which aims to build a “Seed Foundry” of seeds optimized for a range of climates, altitudes, and soils using the gene-editing…

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Yasmin Tayag
Future Human

Editor, Medium Coronavirus Blog. Senior editor at Future Human by OneZero. Previously: science at Inverse, genetics at NYU.